Murder and Terrorism

Murder, She Wrote, continued

Murder and Terrorism

Beginning on August 30, 2013, I posted a series on the criminality research that Doug Quirk and I conducted at the Ontario Correctiopnal Institute. Some of that material is relevant to the current discussion. For example, we identified a set of six factors which we addressed through a series of large-group treatment workshops:

  1. Guilt was the target of the first workshop, and the attempt was made to reduce the amount of guilt feeling and guilt proneness – on the assumption that this would have the effect of reducing guilt intolerance.
  2. Failure was the target of the second workshop, and the attempt was made to reduce the amount of failure feeling and failure proneness – on the assumption that this would have the effect of reducing failure intolerance.
  3. Distress was the target of the third workshop, and the attempt was made to reduce the amount of felt distress (affect) and distress proneness – on the assumption that this would reduce distress intolerance.
  4. Sensitivity was the target of the fourth workshop, and the attempt was made to reduce sensitivity to others – based on the assumption that this would reduce sensitivity intolerance.
  5. Obsessive Rumination was the target of the fifth workshop, and the attempt was made to reduce introspection and worries – on the assumption that this would reduce the associated closeness intolerance.
  6. Discipline was the target of the sixth workshop, and the attempt was made to reduce the subjective experience of external discipline and to increase the subjective experience of freedom – on the assumption that this would reduce discipline intolerance.

 

Each of these factors was conceived of in terms of “character neurosis.” That is, the underlying feelings were (1) to poignantly painful for the individual to accept consciously and (2) being defended against psychologically (and, hence, not available to the criminal’s conscious) through behaviours that got the individual in trouble with the law; and the (successful) treatment was to address the underlying feelings, thereby removing to incentive to behave criminally.

 

I believe that such underlying feelings should be considered in trying to understand the entire radicalization process.

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